Free Freakonomics Signed Sticker

I love how the authors of Freakonomics call their free signed sticker a “free bookplate.” Am I the only person who's never heard of that word before? If I had to guess what it meant, sticker would be #745. I think we all know what number one would be.

Now if you'll excuse me, I'm off to eat some lunch. Where's my copy of 1984?

14 comments on “Free Freakonomics Signed Sticker”

  1. It’s a common term, well when I worked in a bookstore it was very popular. They sell bookplates today, and yes they are simply stickers that you stick inside the book.

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  2. I requested for this bookplate about a year ago after reading Freakonomics (and no, it has nothing to do with Freakzoids), but it never came.

    Freakonomics is term coined by the author Stephen Levitt about how economics shapes the American society. The book is great and opens up a whole new perspective to political, social, and economical issues we face today.

    And I think, after 10 posts, everyone should be clear to what a bookplate is.

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  3. a label with a printed design intended to indicate ownership, usually pasted inside the front cover of a book. Bookplates probably originated in Germany, where the earliest known example, dated about the middle of the 15th century, is found. The earliest dated bookplate extant is also German, from 1516. The earliest dated example by an American engraver is a bookplate for Thomas Dering in 1749.

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  4. I don’t remember not knowing what a bookplate is. I guess being old means you remember this stuff. Being around before the days of technology meant we learned a lot of terms which are considered archaic now!!

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  5. Oh I am ashamed. Not only do I know what it means, but I have customized bookplates which read “This book belongs to Cari, return it, or suffer a fate worse than death”.

    I have a bunch of Author signed bookplates, and ordered bookplates fro my GrandMas Christmas gift…

    *runs off in shame before other hiffers laugh at her*

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  6. hmmm..i’ve always known what a bookplate was..guess school paid off after all!
    people would donate money to the school library and in appreciation they would get a gold label with their name on it placed inside the books that their donation paid for..so i suppose i just associated it more as a ‘name plate’ than a sticker…or piece of china with a sandwich on top πŸ˜‰

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  7. I first ran into “bookplate” when I was getting a freebie from… Janet Evanovich for my mom, a signed bookplate.

    Dunno what “Freakonomics” is, reminds me of Freakazoid, though.

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  8. It’s a real word. And I wouldn’t say it’s an obscure word.

    When I just saw Neil Gaiman he didn’t have time for autographs but they did have signed bookplates for the first 200 people. The advantage in these cases is they can sign stickers on an airplane or in the car and it doesn’t take up too much space.

    It’s kind of an old fashioned concept though.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bookplate

    But you can buy bookplates that say things like “From the library of ________” and then you’d write your name in it. And I’m sure you can order them pre-preprinted…

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